Quantum Life Eternal

Not Linear.

Not Linear.

From the Mail Online:

Quantum physics proves that there IS an afterlife, claims scientist.

Robert Lanza claims the theory of biocentrism says death is an illusion.

He said life creates the universe, and not the other way round.

This means space and time don’t exist in the linear fashion we think it does.

He uses the famous double-split experiment to illustrate his point.

And if space and time aren’t linear, then death can’t exist in ‘any real sense’ either.

I only direct your attention to it because I reached the same conclusion about 35 years ago, based on pretty much the same evidence.

The article, predictably, tells us this is just science. But it’s more than that. If the precondition for matter is consciousness, then you do the math.

But that’s been the dirty secret of quantum physics since the early 1900s. It doesn’t make sense without consciousness.

I’d quote from the article, but why bother? The ones who are dumber than high school physics will scoff. The ones who are smarter than God will scoff harder.

Besides, the article requires thinking about. Who needs that? It’s also not especially well written. Because journalists don’t understand anything about physics. Aw shucks.

Let me boil it down this far for you. In quantum land, time, location, and distance don’t really seem to exist. Which means the universe is governed by laws we used to call magical and unscientific. Everything happens at once and in the same place, which is actually everywhere and all at once. Giving rise to the possibility there’s no before or after, no here, no there, only a unity that gives the illusion of being separated, dispersed, and causal or sequential.

The implications for religion are, of course, profound. The illusion of cause is a universal classroom. But the death of death is an inevitable by-product of seeing the classroom for what it is.

Talk if you want. Proclaim your atheism, which is so much more satisfying. Or remember Christ and think again about his defeat of death. Or forget all of it and think about living life as a plucked moment of an eternally present singing string in which it’s all here all the time and you’re choosing, just like the photon who is both point and wave, to be both point and wave, pierced by the present point and swept up in the wave of time from where you think you were to where you think you’ll go.

7 thoughts on “Quantum Life Eternal

  1. I’m in a quantum mood myself, just covering the double slit experiment on this very day with my wide-eyed freshmen. I love that I get to be the first one to tell them about it and let the implications fall where they may.

    I’m just like them, though, still trying to comprehend it all myself, as if for the first time. The ripples spread out from our lives and return to bounce over us in utterly complex interference patterns. For real. Consciousness matters.

    As much as I admire Isaac Newton, I sometimes wish that Leibniz had been the historically vindicated winner of their clash. His Monadology ideas were centuries ahead of their time.

  2. “Or remember Christ and think again about his defeat of death. Or forget all of it and think about living life as a plucked moment of an eternally present singing string in which it’s all here all the time and you’re choosing, just like the photon who is both point and wave, to be both point and wave, pierced by the present point and swept up in the wave of time from where you think you were to where you think you’ll go.”

    Beautifully put. I saw the same article at work (yep, I’m working for the Man again) and bought the book yesterday evening. I don’t know whether it’ll say anything I don’t already know; but on Amazon, most reviews were good, most bad reviews were from the usual suspects, and for something I already know, I sure seem to need a lot of reminding of it.

  3. I get that there is evidence for something existing outside what we perceive as our dimension of time. That to us, we see life as a non-stop journey from point A to point B. To someone operating on the outside, though, the entirety of time would be open to them, like looking at a timeline graphic in a book. They could go forward, back, or even “sideways”. To them, it would seem like all of time was occurring at once.

    It would also explain déjà vu, which I don’t think gets enough coverage. How is it that everybody experiences this but nobody questions it too much?

    This also makes me think of those certain songs that carry some strong emotional attachment & evoke memories. I’m sure everyone has some of those. Sometimes, depending on the song, it feels more like a wormhole. I feel like I am two places at once, even though one is a memory.

    All that being said, though, I don’t see how the leap is made to infinite parallel universes. I admit that I don’t fully understand the double slit test (the descriptions in the article are vague, at best) but it doesn’t sound like it offers evidence for all those other universes. And boy, dying and bouncing around endlessly through the multiverse sounds like a pretty miserable existence.

    • Finally got to watch this last night. Fascinating, thank you. I am admittedly the type of guy who needs subject matter like that broken down by cartoon visualizations.

  4. I understand the experiment much better thanks to Winston’s video link. However, I’m still not clear on how it shows evidence of the existence of infinite parallel universes. Does it?

    Hopefully we are not done discussing this…

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

Current month ye@r day *